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20100101
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of canada about the cabinet picks for hamid karzai. what is the concern over the choices that president karzai is making? guest: he has now made two set of choices. he nominated one slate of cabinet officials, about 24 of them. 17 were rejected by the parliament. but arlin is in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing -- the parliament is, in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing, checks and balances. he looked at the first slate of nominees by president karzai and parliament did not like them. they did confirm the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, the minister of defense and the minister of interior, which handles all of the police. the minister of finance, the minister of agriculture, when the biggest recipients of assistance. -- one of the biggest recipient of assistance. those picks are clear. president karzai has recently over the weekend submitted a second state to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate are lesser- known people. many people have not heard -- many afghans h
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
, thereby taking the initial i.e.c. count to 54.-- 54 point something percent and having president karzai accept that, which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course the runoff never happened but at least the e.c.c. was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. so with that, let me briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that, so we can have a frank and vibrant discussion and q&a session after that. to my far left, scott warden who just returned to the institute here. he's a senior rule advisor with usit, who was on a leave of absence to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. he was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jdmb. you have their buy yows in front of you, i won't go into too much detail on that. isabel root is desk officer for the e.a.d. at the department of political affairs at the united nati
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
nominees for president karzai's cabinet. one of them was the only female nominee. what does this say about the is stability of afghanistan? >> reporter: it could say two things right now. it could say one, that the afghan government were not obviously happy with president karzai's choices. many parliamentarians have said he basically chose people who helped him during the campaign that he made promises to so he could get the presidency again. another way of looking at this, it's democracy in action. here you have the parliament who are turning down president karzai's choices. we should mention two weeks earlier when i asked the president at a press conference why he didn't have more female choices, he had only had one in his list, he conceded that he knew the parliament would reject a lot of his choices and he told me he expects to have more and more females within this cabinet and women throughout the government. >> brooke. >> an tillal, thank you. >>> we will take an inside look at what is being called the world's newest, tallest building. first though, our random moment in 90 seconds. >
to attack this plane head today america. >> afghanistan's parliament delivering a stinging blow to karzai, voting down 17-24. karzai said he will make new nominations, it's unclear when. in another high stakes political issue the chief of afghanistan as election commission says a parliamentary vote will be held in may despite widespread international concerns. north carolina is going smoke free. effective today the leading tobacco producing state is banning in restaurants and bars and relative late comers in the tobacco ban. becoming 29th ban in restaurants and 24th for bars. any smoker or establishment that refuses to obey the law will face stiff fines. that's are the latest stories, back to you. >> shannon: thank you, caroline. national association of is your ban hospitals are calling on members of to rethink regulations, especially cutting medicare payments. molly henneberg takes a look how tt affect hospitals treating low income patients. >> at howard university hospital in washington d.c., also a level one trauma center, about 20% of patients walk in the door uninsured. although many
. that's the same message we saw and heard in afghanistan with hamid karzai. these reluctant leaders that we, the united states, need. >> that's exactly right, tamron. we'll find the focus shifting from afghanistan to other potential sanctuaries, and in all of these cases we're dealing with teetering or failed states, weak governments, imperfect allies. but we have to work with them and find a way to partner with these imperfect friends and find a way to root out al qaeda within their countries, be much more aggressive with intelligence operations, because we're not going to be able to apply military forces to these places. >> i want to take that point directly to jim at the pentagon. jim, on that point as far as yemen, how much does our military, does our government, how much can we trust the yemeni government? >> there's not a whole lot of trust of the the ability of the yemen government, you know, they do feel at this point that the yemen government is sincere in trying to take down, or at least diminish the effectiveness of al qaeda in yemen itself. it's also dealing with a civil
.s.ilitary. particularlyhen they've been rking together so well recently. >>ose: do you have great confiden in the karzai governmentthat they will be a rtner this snefrt i think we cannot look only toll the national governmenof afghanistan. this is a young govement. they've got ep sysmic flaws they are rdened wh corruption but it is a stggling decracy. but we need to look beyond that at a village level. is is all about polics and as the late tip o'nei said, all politicss local. it's rtainly case in counterterrorism, unterinsurgency. d i think that's the way we must approach it. it's notust capitalto capit nation to naon. th is a fight aboutthe people and forhe people. >> rose: turn your attentn to al qaeda and how they see the world. and where do they get thei momentum and where do they get their strength and where do they get their opportunity. there are many theories and my ess-- and that's all i is s that it may well be about glalization and the growthf free market societies,he owth of liberal institution around the world. and if you lookt in in those terms, we'v made remarkab progre. the u.s. and our
and eventual victory by hamid karzai. they discuss the presidential elections for this may. it was held at the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. >> good morning, everyone. we can proceed. thank everyone for coming. my name is john dempsey with the u.s. institute of peace, based in afghanistan. i have the privilege of actually being here in washington this week for this, our first public event on afghanistan of 2010. i'm so happy we have such a good turnout, i recognize some faces here, see a lot of people i haven't seen around before and i look forward to a frank discussion with our distinguished panelist today on a subject that clearly has been getting a lot of attention over the last year, given what we saw in the difficult election season in afghanistan last year but that also has not yet gone away. i think once we got through the difficult process of the elections last year, people were breathing a collective sigh of relief that we moved on and could actually get on with governance and moving toward with strategic objectives in the country, but yet, we have another electio
karzai's presence because he was so disgusted by the corruption there. and gere toi and we're going to build an army out of that? >> and we have an extensively western base allied to us. but we all know, this is a tribal-based country. the british came and went. the russians came and went. to me, it's just a mystery what we're trying to really do. >> elisabeth bumiller, thank you very much. a great article. >> thanks. thanks. >> it's a frustrating situation and a frustrating country. >> it is. and also, we deal with our own security and how we shore that up. because even all these years later, we find ourselves almost as at risk after 9/11. >> i want someone to commission a poll on body studies. i bet you have 95% of the americans saying, go ahead, we don't care. >>> coming up next, "all things at once," it is not a book so much as it is a way of life. we're going to preview mika's book. it's going to change not only your life, but i would guess america. we'll be right back. ( whistling ) ( sniffing ) missing something? now at sears optical, get 2 pairs of glasses for $99.99. or tak
the president karzai can't count on parliaments report. most of his nominees expressed discontent with the candidates competence. the "new york times" says 17 were rejected and 17 approved. all but one are currently cabinet ministers the president's office had no comment on friday. they said the news conference would be held today. the effect where is difficult to predict it's he'll try to make recess appointments once the parliament leads for the winter break but there's a deep divide between the president and parliament and could leave a number of ministry as drift under deputy ministers that lack political power. this morning from the "new york times". ellen from sunnyville new york. is yemen the new front on terrorism? caller: absolutely. this president and e reck holder don't get it. they're going into more, al qaeda is going into regions where they understand this president won't do anything to the countries that don't have the capabilities we have and nobody is talking about the fact that this animal, actually was going to kill innocent women and children on an airplane ca
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)